Should mulch touch the tree?

Benefits of mulching around trees Mulch should never touch the tree trunk. Mulching trees reduces weeds, eliminating competition for water and minimizing the number of encounters with a lawnmower or lawnmower that could damage the trunk.

Should mulch touch the tree?

Benefits of mulching around trees Mulch should never touch the tree trunk. Mulching trees reduces weeds, eliminating competition for water and minimizing the number of encounters with a lawnmower or lawnmower that could damage the trunk. It's essential for proper tree maintenance, but when the mulch is too high and touches the tree trunk, it can cause problems. Mulch should not be replaced or removed, it should only be stacked on top.

The mulch will decompose and become compost, adding nutrients to the soil. We recommend raking or fluffing old mulch before applying new mulch to it. Raking up the old mulch will mix it up, making sure it doesn't harden into a more solid mass and repels water. Volcanic mulching, also known as overpadding, is the improper mulching technique that stacks mulch around the tree against the tree trunk.

A slight raking of existing mulch may be all that is needed to refresh old mulch and break up compacted or crusty layers that may develop. If you have smaller trees or trees that have only had volcanic mulch for a few years, you can probably dig up the mulch yourself with some garden tools. Mulching mimics the natural environment found in forests, where leaves and branches cover the soil surface, replenishing nutrients as they decompose and creating an ideal environment for root growth. Instead, what you'll want to do is spread the mulch over a wider radius around the tree, BUT make sure it's spread thinner and make sure the mulch is at its thinnest level right in the trunk.

It's also imperative to keep the mulch away from the base of the tree, creating the appearance of a doughnut-shaped hole around the tree with the surrounding mulch.