What is on the forest floor?

Forest soil, also called detritus, duff and horizon O, is one of the most distinctive features of a forest ecosystem. It is mainly composed of shed vegetative parts, such as leaves, branches, bark and stems, which exist in various stages of.

What is on the forest floor?

Forest soil, also called detritus, duff and horizon O, is one of the most distinctive features of a forest ecosystem. It is mainly composed of shed vegetative parts, such as leaves, branches, bark and stems, which exist in various stages of. Wikipedia The forest floor, also called detritus, duff and horizon O, is one of the most distinctive features of a forest ecosystem. It is mainly composed of shed vegetative parts, such as leaves, branches, bark and stems, which exist in various stages of decay above the soil surface.

Although mainly composed of non-living organic material, the forest floor is also teeming with a wide variety of fauna and flora. It is one of the richest components of the ecosystem from the point of view of biodiversity due to the large number of decomposers and predators present, mostly belonging to invertebrates, fungi, algae, bacteria and archaea. Certain (adapted) plants may be more evident in tropical forests, where metabolism rates and species diversity are much higher than in colder climates. Despite its constant shade, the ground floor of the rainforest is the site of important interactions and complex relationships.

The forest floor is one of the main sites of decomposition, a fundamental process for the continuity of the forest as a whole. It is also home to thousands of plants and animals, and provides support to the trees responsible for the formation of the canopy. Ground level is the region of the forest that was first explored and that has been studied most intensively. Forest soil is made up of organic waste (leaves, branches, bark, stems) in various stages of decomposition present in the upper part of the mineral soil.

The food for the forest floor habitat is largely provided from above. Trees produce food throughout the summer and then drop it in the fall. Apart from the annual fall in leaves, trees drop branches, leaves, fruits and even entire trunks during other parts of the year. The “debris” of these trees (as we might think of them) is the energy that keeps the ecosystem of the forest floor functioning.

Leaves are the main food for forest soil, and branches, trunks, and soil also provide plenty of shelter. Forest soil is one of the richest components of the forest ecosystem in terms of organisms, since it houses a large number of decomposers and predators, mainly invertebrates, fungi, algae, bacteria and soil mites. By contrast, lighter and thinner forest soils are generally found in tropical forests, where decay rates are rapid, except in white sands, where nutrients cannot be supplied by mineral erosion. This jungle is characteristic of disturbed forests, usually near the edges of the forest, in recently opened light gaps, on river banks and in areas where the forest is recovering previously cleared land.

By contrast, lighter and thinner forest soils are generally found in tropical rainforests, where decay rates are rapid.